All Of Our Grandmothers

ELIZABETH “OMA” FISHER

She loved us through food. Her's was classic black southern cooking. Her mac and cheese was always there - for any occasion. And, *everyone* loved it. But she made a lot of other amazing things too: sweet potato pie, peach cobbler, green beans with the pork fat in them, shrimp and rice, rice and gravy, collard greens, turnips, pickled beets and...fried chicken. Her fried chicken was the best!


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CARLUCCIA

Whenever Carluccia made beans in pignata, she couldn’t help but to go foraging for wild edible greens. She was hardwired in this way; shelling beans meant autumn, and autumn meant wild greens.


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MRS. LEE SIN

During the invasion, she grew food for her family and rigged up running water through an ingenious use of interconnected hollow bamboo poles. She became known as the smart survivor.


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ANNE AMMITZBØLL

Anne is an Danish adventuress who has spent much of her life exploring the world in search of arts and crafts, new experiences, and foreign cookbooks. Classically trained in cooking at Le Cordon Bleu, from Anne I learned that Danish home cooking is all about pork, potatoes, and cabbage. And in the summer, berries, ærter (shelling peas), and fjordrejer (tiny pink fjord shrimp).


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SUE WHEELER

The only way to get to Lasqueti is by passenger ferry, so you can imagine the surprise when a bear showed up one autumn and started pillaging the island’s apple orchards. Consensus is that it must have floated in on a log.


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USHA

Usha was tender and methodical with her baking. Each day the wooden dough board came out, as did a big knife for cutting butter, and small bowlfuls of ingredients—apples, nuts, plums, and on a rare occasion even chocolate.


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AMBROGINA CAIONE

In 1962 my grandmother began stealing, every other day, from the cash register in my grandfather’s pharmacy.


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MAMMA MARIA

Mamma Maria learnt to cook by her mother’s side. “You just watch and spend time. You lend a hand. Maybe the first time you make a mistake, then the second time you do it right. It’s not that you are “taught.””


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ARMIDA

Armida cooked for an army’s worth of people on Sundays. Thirty or forty locals would come for lunch, bringing goods to exchange with one another, and lingering for hours over her food on long tables set under the olive trees.


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