FRIKADELLER: DANISH MEATBALLS

By ANNE AMMITZBØLL, Europe
FRIKADELLER: DANISH MEATBALLS
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Frikadeller (Danish pork meatballs) are one of those quintessential foods that almost every Dane, young or old, knows how to make; children are even taught how to cook them in school. Anne's frikadeller, however, are particularly special; she uses an handheld electric mixer to beat the ingredients together, producing an exceptionally fluffy meatball. She serves hers with stuvet hvidkål (boiled cabbage in bechamel); they are also often eaten plain, or with rémoulade.
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Place the ground pork, diced onions, salt and pepper into a large mixing bowl. Using an electric hand mixer, beat these ingredients together for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add the milk and flour to the meat and onions, and beat for another 2-3 minutes.
  3. Finally, whisk together the eggs in a small bowl, then add to the meat mixture and beat for a final 2-3 minutes, until the meat has turned a pale pink and appears creamy and fluffy. Cover the bowl, and place it in the fridge to rest for one hour.
  4. After an hour, heat a medium or large skillet over medium heat. Add a small amount of butter (or oil if you prefer) to lightly coat the bottom of the pan. Form large spoonful sized quenelles out of the meat, adding them to the hot skillet as you prepare them. (To form a quenelle, pass a large spoonful of meat back and forth between two soup spoons that are facing in opposite directions. Doing this will create the characteristic egg shape that Anne loves to make for her frikadeller. Alternatively, you could form simple round patties.)
  5. Fry the frikadeller for 3-4 minutes on each side, until nicely browned and cooked through. Set aside on a clean plate until you have finished the whole batch.
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Place the ground pork, diced onions, salt and pepper into a large mixing bowl. Using an electric hand mixer, beat these ingredients together for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add the milk and flour to the meat and onions, and beat for another 2-3 minutes.
  3. Finally, whisk together the eggs in a small bowl, then add to the meat mixture and beat for a final 2-3 minutes, until the meat has turned a pale pink and appears creamy and fluffy. Cover the bowl, and place it in the fridge to rest for one hour.
  4. After an hour, heat a medium or large skillet over medium heat. Add a small amount of butter (or oil if you prefer) to lightly coat the bottom of the pan. Form large spoonful sized quenelles out of the meat, adding them to the hot skillet as you prepare them. (To form a quenelle, pass a large spoonful of meat back and forth between two soup spoons that are facing in opposite directions. Doing this will create the characteristic egg shape that Anne loves to make for her frikadeller. Alternatively, you could form simple round patties.)
  5. Fry the frikadeller for 3-4 minutes on each side, until nicely browned and cooked through. Set aside on a clean plate until you have finished the whole batch.
Recipe Notes

Don't let the double grinding of the pork put you off making this recipe; even without it, this is by far and away the best version of frikadeller that I have ever tasted.

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